Who is eligible

An intellectual disability is a disorder in which a person’s overall intellectual functioning is well below average – generally an intelligence quotient (IQ) of 70 or less; however, IQ is not central to diagnosis. Intellectual disability diagnosis is largely based on severity of limitation in social, conceptual, and practical skills (such as language, reasoning, problem solving, communication, self-regulation, personal care, behavior, etc.) expected of people in their age group and culture.

To be eligible for services, the person must have a diagnosed intellectual disability that results in a substantial functional limitation in three or more of the following areas of major life activity:
– Self-care
– Receptive and expressive language
– Learning
– Mobility
– Self-direction
– Capacity to live independently
– Capacity to become economically self-sufficient (age 18 and over)

A physical disability is characterized by a physical impairment resulting in the functional loss of two or more limbs, which a physician expects will last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months. A person must be capable of supervising, training, and managing his/her attendant, as well as managing his or her own financial and legal matters. The illness or injury could have occurred at any age but the applicant must be over age 18 to be eligible for services.
An acquired brain injury is the result of a traumatic injury to the brain that occurred after birth. An acquired brain injury may be the result of physical trauma to the brain or non-traumatic injury resulting from an external source such as a stroke, brain tumor, infection, hypoxia, toxic exposure, or substance abuse.

A person may be eligible to receive services if the acquired brain injury results in substantial functional limitation in three or more cognitive abilities or physical functioning:
– Memory or cognition
– Activities of daily life
– Judgement and self-protection
– Control of emotion
– Communication
– Physical health
– Employment

Our Division serves a number of people with the following :

  • Acquired brain injury
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Intellectual disabilities and related conditions
  • Supplemental services, on a limited basis, to complement the care provided by caregivers
  • Severe epilepsy

In order to be eligible for services through DSPD, a person must be a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident, and a resident of the State of Utah.


We do not serve people whose only diagnosis is:

  • Mental illness
  • Hearing impairment
  • Visual impairment
  • Learning disability
  • Mental illness or behavior disorder (depending on how the behavioral disorder is defined and diagnosed)
  • Substance abuse
  • Aging
  • Deteriorating diseases and disorders arising after the age of 22, except acquired brain injuries or physical disabilities

Find out if you or a loved one may be eligible for services

Call Toll-Free 1-844-275-3773


Determine if you are eligible


To find out if you or a loved one may be eligible for services through the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, call us at 1-844-ASK-DSPD or 1-844-275-3773 and choose the apply for services option to speak with an intake worker;

– Or –

You may start the intake process immediately by completing one of the following applicable intake packets and returning it to the Division of Services for People with Disabilities.

Intake Packet for Applicants with Intellectual Disabilities or Related Conditions

Intake Packet for Applicants with an Acquired Brain Injury

Intake Packet for Applicants with Physical Disabilities

SPANISH: Intake Packet for Applicants with Intellectual Disabilities or Related Conditions

SPANISH: Intake Packet for Applicants with an Acquired Brain Injury

SPANISH: Intake Packet for Applicants with Physical Disabilities